Porcelaine

Porcelaine

Breed Fact

Country of Origin: France
Hypoallergenic: No
Height: Male: 56–58 cm, Female: 54–56 cm
Weight: Male: 25–28 kg, Female: 25–28 kg
Color: White
Life Expectancy: 9 – 11 years
Temperament: Gentle, Active
Litter Size: 3 - 9 puppies
Health Problems: N/N

Brief info: Believed to be the oldest of the French scenthounds, the Porcelaine is also known as the Chien de Franche-Comte, after a former French region bordering Switzerland. Following the French Revolution (1789-1799), examples of the Porcelaine were found at the Franco-Swiss border, leading to confusion over whether it is of French or Swiss origin.

However, the breed is recognized as French, and is thought to descend from the English Harrier, the now-extinct Montaimboeuf, as well as some smaller Laufhunds of Switzerland. The breed has been recorded in France since 1845 and in Switzerland since 1880, when the first hunting packs were established. At one point after the French Revolution, the breed actually disappeared but was "reconstructed" and now stands on solid ground.

The Porcelaine is mainly used for hunting hare and roe deer in packs and is found mostly in France. The name Porcelaine refers to its shining coat, which makes it look like a porcelain statuette.

During its heyday in the 1700s, the Porcelaine was considerably larger than the modern breed of today. It is a very distinguished-looking dog with a finely chiseled head, a black nose with wide-open nostrils, and a flat forehead. Its eyes are dark with a sweet expression.

The ears are thin, conical and pointed. The neck is long and slender, and the tail is hefty at the base but narrowing to a point at the end.

The skin should be pink with sparse black mottling that shows up through the white coat. From a distance it gives an impression of pale blue glass. The solid white coat is composed of very fine hair of miraculously short length. The color can be interrupted by orange spots on the body but especially on its notable, sizeable ears.